Compared Translations of the meaning of the Quran - 34:14
Saba' - Saba, Sheba
Verse: 34 : 14

< 34:15   34:13 >



Saba' (Saba, Sheba) 34:14

34:14 فلما قضينا عليه الموت مادلهم على موته الا دابة الارض تاكل منساته فلما خر تبينت الجن ان لو كانوا يعلمون الغيب مالبثوا في العذاب المهين


TransliterationFalamma qadayna AAalayhi almawta ma dallahum AAala mawtihi illa dabbatu al-ardi ta/kulu minsaatahu falamma kharra tabayyanati aljinnu an law kanoo yaAAlamoona alghayba ma labithoo fee alAAathabi almuheeni
LiteralSo when We ordered/accomplished on him the death/lifelessness, nothing guided/lead them on (to) his death/lifelessness except the land's/Earth's walker/creeper/crawler , eating his shepherd's staff/stick, so when he fell down the Jinns clarified/explained (to themselves) that (E) if they were knowing the absent/covered , they would not have stayed/remained/waited in the torture the disgracing/degrading.

Yusuf AliThen, when We decreed (Solomon's) death, nothing showed them his death except a little worm of the earth, which kept (slowly) gnawing away at his staff: so when he fell down, the Jinns saw plainly that if they had known the unseen, they would not have tarried in the humiliating Penalty (of their Task).
PickthalAnd when We decreed death for him, nothing showed his death to them save a creeping creature of the earth which gnawed away his staff. And when he fell the jinn saw clearly how, if they had known the Unseen, they would not have continued in despised toil.
Arberry And when We decreed that he should die, naught indicated to them that he was dead but the Beast of the Earth devouring his staff; and when he fell down, the jinn saw clearly that, had they only known the Unseen, they would not have continued in the humbling chastisement.
ShakirBut when We decreed death for him, naught showed them his death but a creature of the earth that ate away his staff; and when it fell down, the jinn came to know plainly that if they had known the unseen, they would not have tarried in abasing torment.
SarwarWhen We decreed that Solomon should die, no one knew of his death except for a creeping creature of the earth who ate-up his staff. When he fell down, the jinn realized that if they had known about the unseen, they would not have remained in such a humiliating torment for so long.
KhalifaWhen the appointed time for his death came, they had no clue that he had died. Not until one of the animals tried to eat his staff, and he fell down, did the jinns realized that he was dead. They thus realized that if they really knew the unseen, they would have stopped working so hard as soon as he died.
Hilali/KhanThen when We decreed death for him (Sulaiman (Solomon)), nothing informed them (jinns) of his death except a little worm of the earth, which kept (slowly) gnawing away at his stick, so when he fell down, the jinns saw clearly that if they had known the unseen, they would not have stayed in the humiliating torment.
H/K/SaheehAnd when We decreed for Solomon death, nothing indicated to the jinn his death except a creature of the earth eating his staff. But when he fell, it became clear to the jinn that if they had known the unseen, they would not have remained in humiliating punishment.
MalikWhen We decreed Solomonís death he was leaning on his staff. The Jinns did not know that he was dead until the termite ate away his staff and he fell down. Thus it became clear to the Jinns that if they had known the unseen, they would not have continued in the humiliating punishment of their task.[14]
QXPWhen We decreed death for him (Solomon), nothing showed his death to the Wild Tribes until a creature of the earth ate away the strength he had mustered. When the power base fell, the Wild Tribes rebelled regretting that they should have done it sooner only if they knew the new unjust King. (The 'creature of the earth' was the highly incompetent son Rehoboam, and successor of Solomon 38:34. Historically, ten of the Israelite Tribes also broke away from the Kingdom at that point).
Maulana AliBut when We decreed death for him, naught showed them his death but a creature of the earth that are away his staff. So when it fell down, the jinn saw clearly that, if they had known the unseen, they would not have tarried in humiliating torment.
Free MindsThen, when We decreed death for him, nothing informed them of his death until a worm kept eating from his staff, so when he fell down, the Jinn realised that if they had known the unseen, they would not have remained in the humiliating retribution.
Qaribullah And when We decreed (Solomon's) death, they had no indication that he was dead until (they saw a termite), a crawler of the earth eating away his staff. And when he fell down, the jinn realized that had they known the unseen, they would not have continued in their humiliating punishment.

George SaleAnd when We had decreed that Solomon should die, nothing discovered his death unto them, except the creeping thing of the earth, which gnawed his staff. And when his body fell down, the genii plainly perceived that if they had known that which is secret, they had not continued in a vile punishment.
JM RodwellAnd when we decreed the death of Solomon, nothing shewed them that he was dead but a reptile of the earth that gnawed the staff which supported his corpse. And when it fell, the Djinn perceived that if they had known the things unseen, they had not continu

AsadYet [even Solomon had to die; but] when We decreed that he should die, nothing showed them that he was dead except an earthworm that gnawed away his staff. [This is yet another of the many Solomonic legends which had become an inalienable part of ancient Arabian tradition, and which the Quran uses as a vehicle for the allegorical illustration of some of its teachings. According to the legend alluded to above, Solomon died on his throne leaning forward on his staff, and for a length of time nobody became aware of his death: with the result that the jinn, who had been constrained to work for him, went on labouring at the heavy tasks assigned to them. Gradually, however, a termite ate away Solomon's staff, and his body, deprived of support, fell to the ground. This story - only hinted at in its outline - is apparently used here as an allegory of the insignificance and inherent brittleness of human life and of the perishable nature and emptiness of all worldly might and glory.] And when he fell to the ground, those invisible beings [subservient to him] saw clearly that, had they but understood the reality which was beyond the reach of their perception, [Al-ghayb, "that which is beyond the reach of [a created being's] perception", either in an absolute or - as in this instance - in a relative, temporary sense.] they would not have continued [to toil] in the shameful suffering [of servitude] [I.e., because they would have known that Solomon's sway over them had ended. In the elliptic manner so characteristic of the Quran, stress is laid here, firstly, on the limited nature of all empirical knowledge, including the result of deductions and inferences based on no more than observable or calculable phenomena, and, secondly, on the impossibility to determine correctly, on the basis of such limited fragments of knowledge alone, what course of action would be right in a given situation. Although the story as such relates to "invisible beings", its moral lesson (which may be summed up in the statement that empirical knowledge cannot provide any ethical guideline unless it is accompanied, and completed, by divine guidance) is obviously addressed to human beings as well.]


Add to your Favorites

Add this page to your Favorites
Close

 

No soul can believe exept by the will of Allah
 

 

donate

Your donation is 100% tax deductible

search our site